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Study focuses on perceptions of distracted driving

New York drivers may be intrigued by the results of a study conducted by Volvo and the Harris Poll about distracted driving, how many people engage in it and how they perceive it. It is broken up into two studies involving 2,000 participants in the U.S. More than 50 percent, regardless of age, felt that they need to refocus because they find they are more distracted than they were five years ago.

Most of the participants asserted that distracted drivers, not intoxicated drivers or speeding or aggressive drivers, posed the greatest threat on the road. Approximately 90 percent agreed that there are more distractions today than there were five years ago with 43 percent citing cellphones as the biggest distraction, followed by 11 percent saying children and 9 percent saying other passengers.

About 81 percent of millennials and Gen Xers admitted to using their phone behind the wheel, followed by 71 percent of Generation Z, who are those born from the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s. Even 50 percent of those belonging to the Silent Generation admitted to it.

Overall, the number came to 60 percent of all participants, yet 90 percent said that they think others are more distracted than they are. Likewise, they perceived that posting on social media, reading emails and surfing the internet are all more common than they really are.

Being aware of the dangers of distracted driving will not necessarily make drivers safer; drivers must make the effort themselves to not be distracted, or they will raise their risk for car accidents. Victims who are not to blame may wish to talk with a lawyer about filing a claim against the other party’s auto insurance company. If successful, they might be covered for their vehicle damage, medical bills, lost wages and other losses. The lawyer may be able to handle all negotiations for a settlement.

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